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  • Damon Johnson (2012)

    Posted January, 2012

    Among the many artists and bands who dominated the soundtrack of my youth in the seventies, two on my short list of favorites were Alice Cooper and Thin Lizzy.  Songs like I’m Eighteen and The Boys Are Back in Town struck the chord of teenage angst and confusion or elicited a sense of bravado that defied any real explanation.

    But, then, why did there need to be an explanation?

    Last year, when I interviewed then - Alice Cooper guitarist, Damon Johnson, it was (and still is) a personal thrill to be able to interview, a) such a great guitarist and, b) one who is connected to one of my childhood heroes.  Little did I know at the time that Damon would be making a seismic shift in his career that would fulfill a huge dream from his youth and connect yet again with a band from the soundtrack of mine.

    In August of last year, Damon announced that he was leaving Alice Cooper’s band and joining Thin Lizzy.  The news was met with both excitement and expressions of “what the heck?!” (or some variation of it). Then, earlier this month, Damon announced a few dates with his musical love child, Brother Cane.

    With all of these developments in Damon’s career in such a compressed period of time, I thought I’d better get off my ample butt and have a chat with the boy to find out what the heck is going on.

    Damon gave me a call from his Alabama home as he was resting up in preparation for Thin Lizzy’s European tour in just a few short days.  If you read my last interview with Johnson (here), you’ll recall that a horrific tornado had just devastated the town of Tuscaloosa, Alabama, very near where Damon lives.  I started our chat by asking him how the area’s recovery was coming along.

    “It’s recovered really well. We were fortunate. We live south of town so we didn’t get all the damage that some of the areas did. It was devastating in parts. But Tuscaloosa, which really got hammered – the biggest and the broadest – there’s still recover there and rebuilding but everybody’s good.  You know, man, you live out there in Texas, so you know what it’s all about. We’re not technically in the tornado belt but I don’t see why not. I mean, we should be with as many as we have. We’ve lived with that stuff our whole lives and nobody gets more freaked out about them than I do. I’m just as scared of them now as I was when I was eight years old. It’s serious stuff.  It’s no fun, brother!”

    We shifted gears to more pleasant subjects like Damon’s upcoming dates with Brother Cane.  I asked if this was the seminal start of a lot more work from the band.

    “I definitely want to build up something with Brother Cane, Randy. You know, the band broke up in the late 90’s – 1999. We had faced so much apathy from MTV, from even our record label, we had so much overhead when we would tour, it was just hard to make a living.  So we really just ran out of gas and said, ‘uncle!’ and went off to do other things.  But the band had so much exposure on the radio and so many people did get to see us through the years – particularly from all the opening slots that we did with Aerosmith, Van Halen, Robert Plant and tours like that. Everywhere I’ve been over the last decade I’ve been inundated with questions about Brother Cane or people commenting about how they love the songs or why I don’t do this or that. That’s because I’ve started no less than four other projects in the last ten years – definitely in an effort to try and get some kind of success with one of my own original music project. More specifically, bands that I had some ownership of and not just be a side guy.

    “My plan for this year – last summer, I pretty much started putting a plan together to work almost exclusively with Brother Cane and start putting together some solo acoustic stuff for this year. I had told Alice about it and I was going to transition out of Alice’s band and, in his words, just take a break for awhile.  He and I love each other, man!  We love working together so I knew that there was a security blanket there – of a place that I could go back to after working on Brother Cane.

    “But, of course, the Thin Lizzy thing changed everything. I didn’t want to just bail out completely on the Brother Cane activity particularly because I had talked about it so much and have been putting some energy in that direction.  Thin Lizzy is my number one priority for obvious reasons. But, whenever it makes sense and whenever I can put it together, I absolutely want to book some Brother Cane stuff – as many as 20 or 30 dates, if possible, maybe more, depending on the schedule.”

    Because Brother Cane performed at last year’s Dallas International Guitar Festival (as well as a solo acoustic performance by Damon), I asked Johnson if he was bringing Brother Cane to it again this year.

    “I so wish that we could do that again, man!  Jimmy (Wallace) and all of the guys at the guitar show basically invited us the week after we played last year.  They said, ‘Man, we want Brother Cane back and we want to do this again.’ I’m afraid there are going to be Thin Lizzy dates. We’re slated to go back to Europe, doing some more package dates with Judas Priest over there. We just did that run in the U.S. with them in October and November. It’s an incredible tour and was very well received. Nothing has been posted, Randy, but, from what I know, that’s kind of what’s gonna be the plan. I’ve got word from the head office to count on Thin Lizzy work starting on the first week of April.”

    After I tightly crossed my arms, stuck out my lower lip and pouted with all my strength, Damon added, “Like I said earlier when we were talking about ownership, I would’ve probably jumped at the Thin Lizzy thing – when I did jump at the Thin Lizzy opportunity anyway – and it started out as just another side man thing similar to what I had done with Alice. But what I wasn’t expecting – or even thinking about – was for those guys to have a meeting with me and offer for me to become a partner in the band – in the touring company. That kind of thing is so unheard of these days and particularly for a heritage act like that that’s been around for awhile, I was floored.

    “As anyone who I’ve done interviews with knows, I’ve blown the Thin Lizzy horn loud and proud my entire twenty-plus year professional career.  That band has massively influenced me as a writer and a guitar player. I’ve said before that I feel like Mark Wahlberg in that movie, Rock Star.  You get to join your favorite band. That’s my life, man!

    “The Brother Cane fans are so cool. I wish that there were more of them. Again, that’s why the band ran out of steam in the first place. We just didn’t quite reach critical mass like a lot of other acts. But the people that loved the band are die-hard and very vocal about it. They’ve been real supportive and they get the Thin Lizzy thing because we used to do Lizzy covers!  So, they get it and out of a commitment to the fans I wanted to go ahead and book this first run of dates, Randy.

    “The first show we’re doing is going to be March 2nd (2012) up in Flint, Michigan. We’re going to try to squeeze in five or six shows in the month of March and we’ll go from there. We’ll see.”

    When I responded by saying that perhaps Brother Cane will be to him what Black Country Communion is to Joe Bonamassa, Johnson responded, “I would love to do that, man. I would SO love to do that. I’m thinkin’ down the road, too, it’s not always a lot of fun for a lot of my friends who are side men, as well, to be a slave to waiting on the phone to ring. Sometimes, it doesn’t ring, man. It can be frightening, particularly in this day and age. I feel so blessed, so lucky that I’ve had some of the accomplishments that I’ve had- specifically, a situation like Brother Cane.

    “Another thing, I held off forever on doing any work with Brother Cane because I felt for so long that it had to be the original guys and it took me awhile for me to get over that. Now I’m over it. I hear it from old radio friends, from people in the business who say, ‘Look, Damon, we don’t know what the band looks like. You guys weren’t on MTV. All I know is that you sang those songs; you wrote those songs and that’s your guitar playing that’s featured on there.’

    “So, I called up my drummer, Scott, and said, ‘What do you think?’ and he said, ‘Yeah!’ That’s the plan. If we can work with the other original guys, if the schedule permits, absolutely, man!  It’s just hard to get everybody together because everyone has lives and commitments and other things happening. But, for Scott and I to go ahead and book some dates and not have to wait on the perfect line-up, it means that we’ll get to do more shows and that’s what we really want to do.”

    Putting a nice little bow on the Brother Cane discussion package, I asked Johnson if there were any plans for a new Brother Cane CD in the future.

    “I’m definitely writing and would love to do another CD, Randy. Absolutely.  I mean, really and truly, we weren’t a big enough band that we could go out there and play the hits like Alice Cooper can or like Thin Lizzy can. We just didn’t have that big of a catalog so I think it would be almost vital – if we’re going to tour, if we’re going to crank up that machine again, then we’re going to have to have some new music to be talking about, playing and be promoting and mix that into the catalog, as well.”

    To shift gears over to begin discussing Damon’s move to Thin Lizzy, I led into the subject by mentioning what some of the chatter about his move was like among Boomerocity readers and fans.  I asked Johnson what he had heard from his fans about the move.

    “The people that really know me and the people who have followed my website and come to my acoustic shows and have really been a Damon Johnson fan, you could’ve asked any of them, ‘Hey, what would Damon decide to do’ and they would say, ‘Thin Lizzy without a question’. Yes, Alice is a bigger name in many countries – certainly in the United States.

    “Alice has had 20-something guitar players in his line-up which blows a lot of peoples’ minds. They don’t even believe me when I tell them that but it’s a fact!  Alice is a solo artist and that’s his band, it’s his entity, it’s his trademark. Essentially, for a guy like myself who has a big family and has a lot of people counting on him – it’s almost like a professional athlete. You go and play for a team. They bring you on, you work out a deal and say, ‘This is what I’m going to work for’.   Then, another team will call you and say, ‘Hey, we can move some things around and we can draft you on this team and we can pay you twice as much money.’  Hey, man, it’s like getting a promotion in any other job.  That’s the reality of life and I really laugh sometimes when I see people criticizing any band that’s out playing and go, ‘Oh, these guys are just out there for the money!’  That’s just life! You’re born. You go to school. You get a job, make money and then you die!  That’s the whole gig! So, if your craft is guitar playing, then you’ve got to look for work as a guitar player.

    “Alice has been such an amazing employer beyond being one of my best friends in the world. I always feel a little uncomfortable talking so much specifics about what’s up with it but I probably would’ve taking the Thin Lizzy job just on the sheer terms of the financials of it. But, like I said, anybody that knows me they know that it’s way beyond that. I would’ve taken a pay cut, Randy, to play with Thin Lizzy!  That’s how much that it means to me, man!  I would!  That stuff changed my life.

    “Was I a fan of Alice Cooper as a kid? Yes. I was a fan of some songs. But, bro, I can tell you, out of eleven studio records that Thin Lizzy made, I can tell you the song order on eight of them – what’s on side a and what’s on side b and who’s playing what guitar solo, what the lyrics are, what key it’s in. It’s just a different passion for me as a fan, as a guitar player and as a songwriter being associated with Thin Lizzy. This is actually fun for me to talk to you about this in such terms because, in a way, I can’t really say it any better than that. And, yeah, Alice is amazing and he’s a legend and an icon. The Thin Lizzy opportunity would’ve never happened for me had it not been for Alice. I owe him nothing but gratitude, love and support. I just saw him over New Year’s Eve and I know that I’ve got a home there – playing guitar for that guy for as long as he wants to keep doing it. And, I assure you, man, Alice Cooper is NOT going to retire at sixty-five.  He’s gonna be doing this for a long, long time, as he should!

    “When I used to listen to Thin Lizzy songs as a kid, it would bring me to tears or it would motivate me in some relationship I was in. I have countless stories about it, man!  You know die-hard Beatles fans or die-hard Zeppelin fans? That’s the kind of fan I am of Thin Lizzy.  And now I’m their guitar player!  It’s unbelievable!  That stuff just doesn’t happen!

    “I went to see Ted Nugent in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1979 at the Vaun Braun Civic Center and we didn’t know who the opening act was until we walked in the building. One of the ushers or security people said, ‘Yeah, it’s this band, Thin Lizzy’.  All I knew was The Boys Are Back In Town and those guys came out and just crushed my face! I was fifteen or sixteen and I hit the streets the next day looking for as much Thin Lizzy as I could get my hands on. It’s been almost an obsession for almost thirty years!

    “Eric Bell. Brian Robertson. Gary Moore. Snowy White. John Sykes. And, now, Damon Johnson. Wow!  Come on, man!  Come on!  Maybe I have done it for egotistical reasons, too.  I mean what a list of names to be associated with!  Every one of those guys are world class, amazing guitar players. And, ever since I’ve officially joined the band, I’m a part of every business meeting. I’m a part of every conversation about the set list, about new material, about the tour, about these dates. That’s incredible, man!  That’s what I had with Brother Cane and I haven’t had that kind of thing since then. So, I feel a lot of pride and a lot of gratitude, man.

    “It’s tough to compartmentalize that answer when someone says, ‘Hey!  What was that guy thinking, man?! Alice is so much bigger!’ I’ll let you tell ‘em.  You can explain it!” Damon says with a laugh.

    “And I’ll tell you this, too, Randy, when I leave Sunday to go to London, we’ve got three days of production rehearsals and then we’re doing a four week run.  We’re playing many of the exact same venues that I play with Alice and, in some cases, we’ve already sold those out. Not everybody can sell out 2,000, 3,000 seat venues. Thin Lizzy meant a great deal to European fans, much more than they did over here in the States.  Then, I talk to fans in the U.K. and they don’t have a clue who Brother Cane is. They don’t have a clue, man, and we were a staple on rock radio for seven years. You couldn’t turn on rock radio and not hear a Brother Cane song.  It just depends on timing and a lot of factors that are obviously out of your control.”

    I had read recently that Johnson had a pretty sweet gig in Hawaii during the New Year’s celebrations.  Among the rock and roll dignitaries who Damon performed with were Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler, Michael McDonald and Pat Simmons from the Doobie Brothers, and Mike Meyers.  I asked him to tell me about that.  With a laugh that reflected his “can you believe my luck” feelings, he responded by saying, “Yeah, man, that supports my statement earlier that I’m a part of the Alice Cooper family and, hopefully, will be for years to come. Yeah, it worked out that the band guys – Chuck (Garric), Tommy (Henriksen) and Glen (Sobel) – were going to come and work with Coop, who was going to be the featured act at this charity event that Alice’s manager has there in Maui every year.

    “When the other artists that were going to be involved  - when the guys found out who they were going to be backing up, they called me and said, ‘Dude! You need to be here for this, man!’ I had already played with Steven (Tyler) before and they knew that I was a big Doobie Brothers fan and played a lot of those songs throughout my life in the clubs and that kind of stuff. I was so excited that they called me. Steve Hunter couldn’t be there and (Damon’s replacement in Alice’s band) Orianthi was already booked doing her solo tour for her new record. So, yeah, man, I just went down there and had a blast! It was a great, great night and a great 3 ½ - 4 days. It was a lot of fun!”

    Since you can hardly turn the TV on without seeing Steven Tyler on it, I asked if Damon had any plans to work with Tyler or, for that matter, with the Doobie Brothers again.

    “Those things just kinda happen. I’ve got mutual friends in Steven’s camp. I’ve got mutual friends in the Doobie Brother’s camp so you just never know. But it’s cool man – you can see it in their body language that they get really comfortable really fast because they’ve all had to jam some of their classic material with a group of sidemen or some thrown together group for some charity event or some function, whatever. We really brought the ‘A Game’. We blew up those Aerosmith songs and the Doobie Brothers songs. It wasn’t even work, Randy. That was a labor of love right there, man!

    Again reflecting his true humility and gratitude for the fruits of his musical labor, Damon, tells of the mind-blowing line-up for another charity event rock-out a few months ago.

    “I’ve just had an incredible year. I played with Steven back in September in Vegas for that iHeartRadio event. So, on Sweet Emotion the band was myself, my friend, Marti Fredrickson, on drums, Steven on vocals, Jeff Beck on guitar, Sting on bass!  That’s my bucket list band!  I betcha if you could dig up old interviews, you’d say, ‘Who’s the best guitar player?’ I would’ve said, ‘Beck’.  ‘Who’s the best bass player?’  I’ve said ‘Sting’ forever because I was such a fan of his songwriting. And, Tyler, he’s my top three – him, Paul Rodgers and - hell, I don’t know who the third guy is.  Maybe it’s the top two!” Damon said, laughing.

    Whenever I can, I like to poll you Boomerocity readers for questions that you would like to see asked of the people I interview.  I don’t always get to use them but I do try to ask for suggestions from y’all.  When I knew that I was going to chat with Damon again, I asked for question ideas.  While I couldn’t use most of them (“Is Thin Lizzy anorexic?”), a musician friend of mine wanted to know what would Damon call his greatest career moment and which group did it come with.

    “That’s a great question. I’d have to roll the clock back. Probably my biggest moment – my biggest gig ever – was when Brother Cane played Madison Square Garden, opening for Aerosmith. A year and a half before, we were still in a development deal with the label and I was looking for a singer. We had been through three singers already because I wanted to be a guitar player and just a guitar player. The label guy heard me sing in a bar one night, singing a couple of covers – ironically, a Thin Lizzy cover and a Doobie Brothers cover, thank you very much – and he shoved me behind the mic the next day in the studio. A year and a half later, we’re opening for Aerosmith at Madison Square Garden. We’ve got the number one rock track in America with Got No Shame. Wow! Hard to top that, man.

    “There’s a couple of huge shows with Alice Cooper. We played that giant Wacken Festival in Germany in 2010 and it was 75,000 people. That’s a feeling you won’t ever forget. Walking on stage with Thin Lizzy for the first time in San Antonio, Texas, on October the 14th, 2011, that was a big one, too, man!”

    Like some of you, I’ve never had the privilege of attending a Thin Lizzy gig so I asked Doman what people expect from a current Thin Lizzy show.

    “You can expect a massive commitment to the great sound – the classic sound – that the band had.  They’ve had a couple of different guitar players in recent years that were amazing but were also influenced by newer hard rock, metal guitar players – kind of the ‘post-Eddie Van Halen’ school. I’m a huge Eddie fan – huge fan – but we’ve had specific discussions about getting great guitar tone and, as Scott Gorham says, ‘that classic Lizzy sound’. We’re committed to doing that.

    “They can expect that and they can expect to get their minds blown, Randy, at what an amazing front man Ricky Warwick is. Ricky is from Belfast. He grew up a Thin Lizzy fan his entire life and he’s had – I don’t want to say ‘a similar career as mine’ – he used to front a band called ‘The Almighty’ that was actually quite bigger than Brother Cane ever became. They did well in Europe and in Japan but weren’t able to keep it together. He’s done solo records and a lot of people in the industry knows Ricky and are very aware of his talent.

    “Ricky’s a lot like Phil (Lynott). He’s a punk from the streets. He’s not Mr. Crooning Songsmith as Phil was not, either. There’s such a common ground in their spirit and their work ethic and their commitment to live performance. Ricky’s very inclusive of the audience.  He brings everybody kind of inside, spiritually when we do these songs. Phil was always like that. I’m as excited about getting to work with Ricky as I am the other guys in the band and who are the original guys. It’s really special, man.”

    So, what’s on the Thin Lizzy radar as far as projects and activities are concerned?

    “These guys absolutely want to make a new record. Again, it’s such an honor for me, and really flattering, that they would now say, ‘okay, we’re ready to do this’ because there’s been facsimile out there, off and on, for the last ten years. But Scott and Brian never felt like they had the will or the energy to. It took them both a long, long time to get over Phil’s passing. They were thick as thieves, as they say. And, of course, Phil is a one-of-a-kind artist.  He’s like Freddie Mercury or David Bowie.  He’s just an icon, man!  He wrote most of those songs.

    “I know that they have so much confidence in Ricky’s position now as the singer. He’s a super talented songwriter. He’s not only got the songwriting chops, he’s also got the respect and commitment and he takes great pride in the Thin Lizzy name that they would want a guy take into the studio and make a new record. I certainly would be proud to add that to my list of accomplishments - that I co-wrote and performed on a Thin Lizzy record. Come on, man!

    “Look, man, I get any and every naysayer that says, ‘um, you guys go out there and play the songs and it’s cool. I get it. But we gotta draw the line at new music because Phil was one of a kind.’ I don’t disagree with that. Phil was one of a kind. But Brian Downey went to high school with the guy and he played on every single record that that band ever made. When you’ve been a part of something that big and that successful, where’s the rule book that says you can’t carry the legacy on with some other guys.  Queen did it. If Queen can do it, there’s no greater argument that I can come up with.   Everything moves forward. We can’t go back. None of us can go back. We wish we could. We wish that we could’ve saved Phil. We wish that we could’ve done things differently – all of us in our lives and our careers.

    “But Thin Lizzy is alive and well in 2012. It’s a six member band and it’s a band full of guys who are songwriters. It’s never been a band like that, you know? So, if we’re getting the green light from Brian, Scott and from Darren – Darren was the keyboard player on four of those studio records – to have their support and their enthusiasm to move forward, I’m gonna work as hard as I can to come up with great ideas and make a great record.”

    To keep up with all things Thin Lizzy, Damon Johnson and Brother Cane, be sure and visit the links provided below.  Trust me when I say that catching any gig that Damon Johnson is a part of promises to be a very good time for everyone.  So, whether it’s with the great Thin Lizzy, Brother Cane or one of Damon’s solo acoustic gigs, you’ll definitely be in for a real treat.

    Thin Lizzy     Damon Johnson

  • Damon Johnson Discusses "Echo"

    Posted August, 2016

     

    damonjohnson2016002If you’re a fan of Alice Cooper, Thin Lizzy, or Black Star Riders, then you most definitely know who guitarist, Damon Johnson, is. His finesse on the axe has taken him around the world with these acts who are household names in the music world.

    Damon recently released his latest five song EP entitled, “Echo” (available on Amazon and iTunes) and recently chatted with me about it, beginning with answering my question as to how many solo albums “Echo” makes for him.

    “Yeah, I guess, technically, this would be my third but it is truly my first fully electric album. I put out two acoustic albums. The first one was almost a fluke. It was just for fun. Then, I put out another one back in 2010. So, this is my first, fully realized, full band, lots of guitar kind of album. I’m really, really proud of it. I hope that it’s the first of many.

    “I love this idea of the EP. I really do think it’s a great concept to have four or five brand new songs and get those out. Then, maybe within a year, get another four or five songs out.”

    Johnson shared what the motivation behind the EP was.

    “I would say that, truly, the greatest motivating force had to be my producer and my great friend,johnsonschonguilfordDamon (R) with Journey's Neal Schon (L) & luthier John Guilford - Photo by Randy Patterson Nick Raskulinecz. Nick and I both live in Nashville. I have been a fan of Nick’s for years. He’s produced so many great rock records. So, when we met randomly at an Iron Maiden show a few years back, I was just knocked out to get to talk to this guy! He was so approachable and really cool. Ironically, our wives became really close because Nick and I have small kids. So, while he and I were doing our various things, the girls would actually connect and get the kids together and whatever.

    “So, Nick produced the second Black Star Riders album, The Killer Instinct. It was a great experience for the whole band but it also gave Nick a chance to really get to know me and what I’m all about musically and as a rock writer and as a player. Not long after we finished that album, he called me out of the blue one day and he said, ‘Hey, man, I’ve got some time. My studio is free. If you want to come on in and record some of your own stuff . . . “and he said, “I’m sure you’ve got songs,” which I did and always do.

    “I think, really and truly, it was that phone call. In my head, I had always thought, ‘Wow! It would be great to record some stuff” but, man! It’s a process. There’s a lot of moving parts. You’ve got to get the guys. You’ve got to pay the guys. You’ve got to pay for the studio. There’s so many factors. With Nick’s help, it was incredible.

    “Once we started taking steps in that direction, then I really got the momentum up in my brain to carry it all the way and get it done.”

    Continuing by sharing who was on the EP with him, Damon said:

    “There’s a guy on drums, Jarred Pope, who played with me in a band called Whiskey Falls. I did a country project back in 2007 for a couple of years. I met Jarred when he was still living in Bakersfield, California. I was blown away by his musical instincts as a drummer. I always told him, ‘One day, bro, we’re going to figure out a way to get a studio or get on stage and play some rock and roll.’ Ironically, Jarred is another transplant to Nashville. He moved to town a little before I did so as soon as I arrived, we hooked up and introduced him to some people I knew and vice versa. So, when I got ready to do this solo thing, I didn’t hesitate to reach out to Jarred.

    “On the bass guitar, is a guy a named of Tony Nagy. I met Tony through my good friend, Chuck Garric. We played together in Alice Cooper. Chuck is still in Alice’s band. Chuck is also a new transplant to Nashville. I always call Chuck first because he’s my brother and we’ve done so much together. I love him and his wife. They’re amazing people. But he had so many other commitments so he said, ‘You gotta check out this guy, Tony Nagy.’ That’s how Tony came to me.

    “So, it was just the three of us in the studio. I play all the guitar. All the keyboards. Taurus pedals. Some percussion. I just had a great time! I really couldn’t be happier with how it turned out.”

    Johnson then shared a rundown about the stories behind the five songs.

    damonalicegenland1Damon & His Former Boss, Alice Cooper - Photo Courtesy of Damon Johnson“There’s two songs: ‘Dead’ and another song called ‘The Waiting Kills Me’. I wrote them both with my friend, Kelly Gray. I don’t know if you remember, Randy, that Kelly produced the Wishpool album for Brother Cane. Kelly and I also had a band together for a little while called Slave To The System. These were two songs that we thought might make a sophomore STTS release. It just wasn’t possible to get everybody’s schedules to line up. I knew that they were both great songs so I’ve been kinda sitting on those for a while.

    “Another song is “Nobody Using,” which I really love. It’s got so much tempo and energy. It just kicks ass, man. It reminds a lot of my fans of “Got No Shame” – kinda reminiscent of that in its intensity.

    “Yet another song is “Just Move On” that I co-wrote with my buddy, Marty Frederickson, who I’ve worked with for two decades now. He and I wrote all those Brother Cane songs together. All the radio singles – we wrote those together.

    “Then, Marty actually brought me what I feel is a gift in the form of a song called ‘Scars.’ ‘Scars’ is probably my favorite song of the five. Just an incredible lyric and an amazing vocal melody and it just gave me a bed to come up with some really – I guess – fulfilling guitar parts. I tried to keep them very lyrical. It’s a great lyric. It really spoke to me and I’ve had a lot of people reaching out and talking about how much they love that song.

    “All five songs are different. Different in tempo and dynamic. Lyrical content. I kinda think that’s been my story my whole career. I’ve never really been part of one style or one specific sound. I wouldn’t have it any other way. I’m very pleased to get these five songs out to represent where I’m at, right now, and where I’m headed.”

    When I asked Damon which song he would use as a calling card for “Echo”, he said:

    “I guess that I would have to base that some feedback I’ve gotten from the fans, my friends, and my inner circle. I think a lot of people are gravitating towards ‘Dead’. ‘Dead,’ in some ways, it could’ve been a really cool Alice Cooper song. Lyrically. Guitar-wise. Kinda trashy. It’s got a real sexy tempo to it. I just think it’s exactly what you said. It just might be the statement song for the album. I have to mention ‘Nobody Using,’ as well. I’ve gotten a lot of great support in Europe. I’ve gotten some radio airplay. A lot of my Black Star Riders/Thin Lizzy supporters over there have gravitated towards that song. I have to give some credit to my great friend, Johnny Blade. He and I wrote that together. He’s another monster talent. I love to get into a room with another creative mind like that. Nine out of ten times, we not only come up with something, but we come up with something pretty fast. He and I are actually working on some new songs right now so you’ll hear more from that collaboration.”

    As for tour plans in support of the EP, Johnson shared:

    “There are absolutely plans to get out and tour. The way my schedule looks for the next six months, we’re going to do a handful of Thin Lizzy festival dates. In August, Black Star Riders are back in the studio with Nick Raskulinecz right here in Nashville to record the follow-up, which will be our third album. So, as soon as we get that wrapped up, that is totally my plan - is to be out, doing some dates to promote ‘Echo.’ That will probably be the latter part of September and into October and November. I’ve already done a handful of shows with my guys. The set list is just ridiculous. Plenty of Brother Cain songs. I play a couple of Black Star Rider songs. We certainly do a Thin Lizzy song. We pretty much play everything off of the new EP and we’ve actually worked up a medley of BAD. ASS Alice Cooper songs. It lasts about eleven minutes. It’s a barn burner, Randy! I hope you get to hear it!

    The music world has been a-buzz with news that Damon’s former boss, Alice Cooper, was reuniting his original band members for a new album. I asked Johnson what his thoughts were about that news.

    “I’ll say this: I’m a little out of the loop as to what or how those specific plans are coming together. I truly am. I know that Alice has been busy with his Hollywood Vampires thing and he has dates with his current band kind of booked throughout the remainder of the year. If there are, indeed, dates with the original band – there’s no question that that would be and is very, very cool! It’d have to be fun for Dennis and the guys to go out and do some proper dates with Coop like that. And I think it would be great of Alice to give those guys that opportunity.

    “That original band was incredibly special. The further distance we get away from that, I think it becomes even more obvious how special they were. Alice has had dozens and dozens of different lineups as a solo artist through the years. But nothing can touch that original band. There was a special chemistry and it was a special sound that had a special swagger that’s not been duplicated since then. Not necessarily that he wants to but those guys played very, very unique together. You can bet – if they’re out there on some dates, I’m going to see one . . .or ten! Ha! Ha! If humanly possible, I’ll definitely be in the house to see that!”

    Regarding what’s on his career radar for the foreseeable future, the renown axe man said:damonjohnsonthinlizzyPhoto Courtesy of Damon Johnson

    “The plans for me, I’m hoping, are a mirror image of everything that has happened over the last twelve months. It’s really been the most fulfilling year I think I’ve ever had in my career. It’s an honor to be a part of Black Star Riders. It’s a real band. It’s truly growing its fan base at a time where it couldn’t be more difficult for guys our age just playing straight ahead rock to go out and build a following. We feel that momentum. We’re energized by it so we’re going to absolutely be balls to the wall with continuing Black Star Riders.

    “Thin Lizzy, it’s Scott’s band. Scott is my brother; my bandmate in Black Star Riders. Whenever he wants to do a handful of those, I’m certainly available. Again, what an incredible experience for me and Ricky to be a part of that Thin Lizzy band with Scott, as well. The rest of the time, I’ll be doing my stuff. I really would love to put out another acoustic album. My wife laughs. She goes, ‘You’re kind of like a southern version of Neil Young. You can put out these introspective, folk singer/songwriter things and then fire up the amps with the band and be rockin’ in the free world.’ Ha! Ha! So, I told her that was an incredible compliment so I’m certainly flattered by it.”

    Whether you catch Damon with Thin Lizzy, Black Star Riders, a random pick up jam band, or one of his amazing acoustic gigs, you will be in for an incredible musical treat. If you get the chance to meet him, you’ll have met one of the nicest, warmest, most genuine people God’s green earth.

    Keep up with Damon at any of these links:

    Website:     Damon Johnson     Thin Lizzy     Black Star Riders

     

    Twitter:      Damon Johnson      Thin Lizzy     Black Star Riders         

    Facebook:   Damon Johnson     Thin Lizzy     Black Star Riders

  • Release

    releasealbumcoverRelease
    Damon Johnson
    Label: CDBY
    Reviewed: May, 2011

    Release is the second solo project released by guitarist, Damon Johnson, which, like his first solo album, Dust, is all acoustic. While there are some tunes between the two albums that complement each other, Release presents an excellent collection of mostly Johnson crafted tunes that have a feel and vibe all their own.

    Beautifully crafted lyrics, perfect melodies and chording on the guitar and vocals all make Release a must-have album for your listening library. While Johnson is certainly capable of blazing acoustic and electric guitars, alike, with his incredible playing ability, it’s how he plays simple chords and melodies on each song. One additional note or chord would have upset the balance of these excellently crafted jewels and Damon seems to know that as he offers them up. Cuts like the title song, as well as Dayton, Ohio, Leave It All Behind and Satellites conjured up memories of Layne Staley while have sounds distinctly Damon.

    As is often the case, while I loved the entire album, I do have a couple of personal favorites. Pontiac takes me back to my teens, tearing up roads all over the country. I swear that I can almost smell the farms and orchards I used to drive by as a kid as I listen to this song. Another favorite is Just Feel Better. Co-written by Damon and originally recorded by Santana with Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler kicking in with vocals, Johnson sings it with the heart and soul of one who lived the story told within the lyrics. Listen to this song once and it will stay in your cranium for hours.

    Okay. I lied. I have a third favorite from the album. Generation Landslide from Alice Cooper’s 1973 album, Billion Dollar Babies, is remarkable for several reasons. One being that, though performed acoustically, the song is bang-on identical to the original recording. So much so that the second reason for its remarkableness is that, because I knew that Alice was on that song, I assumed that he provided all of the vocals on it. Nope. Except for the help on the chorus lines, Johnson delivered a perfect delivery of the tune. It even fooled the Snakemeister himself (you can read about that here). The third remarkable attribute of this song is Cooper playing the harmonica exactly as he did on the original recording. This song alone is worth the entire purchase price.

    If you love great acoustic guitar gently coated with beautiful lyrics and delivered with perfect vocals, you will want your copy of Release. You’ll be telling your friends all about it by the second listen. It’s that good.

Featured Photo

Jim Keltner.Broken Glass DW

Our Featured Photo by Boomerocity friend and famed rock photographer, Rob Shanahan (robshanahan.com), is is a bit different from past featured photos. 

 

 

The Boomerocity Interview Vault

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