• everynightscoverEvery Night’s A Saturday Night
    Author: Bobby Keys with Bill Ditenhafer
    Forward by: Keith Richards
    Publisher: Counterpoint Press
    Release Date: February 28, 2012
    Review Date: April 8, 2012

    I’ve got to interview lots of artists. As of this writing, I’ve conducted close to ninety interviews. The most fun are the kinds of interviews are the ones where the person is just rattling off story after story about their life and the people they’ve associated with over their careers. What is even more enjoyable is when those conversations are relaxed and folksy – without pretense or an uppity attitude.

    One such person that I’ve recently interviewed is Bobby Keys, saxophonist for the Rolling Stones. To paraphrase what I wrote in that interview, he’s folksy and as country as cornbread – my kind of people! Bobby’s a great guy to chat with and one of the most fun guys I’ve had the privilege of interviewing.

    You might not be able to interview Bobby Keys yourself but I can offer you the next best thing: His autobiography, Every Night’s A Saturday Night. Easy to read and very natural, you get the feel that you’re sitting in Keys’ family room, sipping on iced tea as he regales you with tales of his life as one of the go-to sax players in rock and roll. Because of who all he’s worked with, I refer to him as the Forest Gump of Rock and Roll. When you read Saturday Night, you’ll see what I’m talking about.

    You’ll read about the whole, complete story about his fabled bath in a tub of Dom Perignon. You read some very interesting stories about his friendship with John Lennon and his work with George Harrison and hanging with Harry Nilsson. You’ll read about his tours with Joe Cocker as well as Delaney and Bonnie. He tells of his meetings with Buddy Holly and Elvis Presley.

    Of course, there are lots and lots of stories about some band called the Rolling Stones and some guys by the names of Keith Richards, Ron Wood, Mick Jagger and their keyboardist, Chuck Leavell. No, he really doesn’t dish any dirt on the lads. As he said in my interview with him, that’s all be said and done already. To Keys, it’s all about the music and the friendships and that’s what makes Every Night’s A Saturday Night such a fun and enjoyable read.

    It goes without saying that avid Stones fans will want this book. However, if you love true – and often hilarious – stories about some of the greatest names in rock music (as well as some of the songs and albums associated with them), you’re going to want this book.

  • lifecoverLife
    Author: Keith Richards with James Fox
    Publisher: Little, Brown, and Company
    Reviewed: November, 2010

    The long awaited autobiography by legendary Rolling Stone guitarist, Keith Richards, is now in stores and being devoured by fans the world over. Weighing in at 544 very readable, informative, historical pages, I was pleasantly surprised at lucidity with which “Keef” tells his story.

    I know some of you will credit James Fox for making Richards easily comprehendible and that may very well be the case. However, Fox still needed a lot to work with. That said, my bet is that this is Keith “thru and thru” (Stones fans will get the pun.

    The book opens with Richards’ perspective of the famous 1975 bust in Fordyce, Arkansas, cluing the reader in to the negotiations and shenanigans that took place to get him and Ronnie Wood sprung from jail. I was particularly interested in this story since Keith alluded to the event when my daughter and I caught the Stones during their tour stop in Little Rock in 2007.

    The rest of the book is equally as unvarnished in telling known and unknown stories about the Stones. Stories behind the songs? Absolutely. Stories about the women in his life? Yep. How ‘bout Brian Jones’ death. A little bit. What about the legendary drug use? C’mon! We’re talking about Keef! Of course he spills the beaker on it all.

    Also shared in his own way with words are war stories from the road, the studio and a myriad of places from around the world. The gossip-monger that resides in each and every one of us will especially relish the digs and barbs he reserves especially for Mick Jagger. How much of it is for show or for real, I don’t know. But it does make for some very fascinating reading.

    What will be of special interest to musicians – especially guitarists – will be the various secrets to much of Richards’ guitar playing. This, along with the stories behind the songs, is where you see the world in which Keith Richards lives and breathes, deservedly giving him the reputation as being a true rock troubadour.

    The tome closes with a heart touching story of some of the last moments with his mom as she lay dying. To me, the story shows me that Keef isn’t as out of it as he likes to come across. He allows the reader a peek into a very special and personal moment in his life without sharing everything. One is left with the feeling that there other things that took place between a mother and her son before she passed away.

    The book left me with the impression that Keith wanted to tell everything from his perspective while, at the same time, say some things that he felt needed to be said. He clearly is seeing that there’s less of life’s road ahead of him than there is behind him. Perhaps that’s why he’s obviously no longer as concerned about his rock and roll pirate image as he places more importance on family and relationships.

    Such is Life.