Thomas Gabriel (Johnny Cash's Grandson)

Written by Randy Patterson

Posted August, 2018

ThomasGabriel0001bNext month, it will have been fifteen years since the world lost the great Johnny Cash. Cash was brash, creative, and even bleeding edge in his approach to music and performing. If you have ever wondered: What if he were young and alive today; what if he were writing and performing music today; what if . . . a lot of things about the Man in Black.

The answers to those questions just may be in the person of his eldest grand kid, Thomas Gabriel. If you don’t believe me, give his debut CD, Long Way Home, a close listen and tell me it ain’t so. 

Yeah, really.

It was because of Long Way Home – and coordinating with his label, CashTown Records, and his crack publicist team at Blue Moon Experience Group, that I had the privilege of speaking with Gabriel by phone at his Middle Tennessee home.

I genuinely like his work and the story he has to tell. While his grandpa is obviously a draw for him, I really think his story is compelling without the sizzle of the Cash name. I'd have wanted to interview him just for that, alone. He's going to have a tremendous, positive impact on people. 

Because his name isn’t yet a household name, I asked Thomas to give us the Reader’s Digest version of his story.

“Obviously, I’m the oldest grandchild of Johnny Cash. I’m originally from California – Ventura, California, and moved here (the Nashville area) when I was young. My mother was extremely young when she had me, so I spent a lot of time with my grandparents; spent a lot of time on the road, motels, hotels, and buses and planes and that sort of thing. 

“I called it ‘The Fish Bowl’ growing up. We were in the bowl looking out to see all these faces every time we pulled into a newEverythingKnoxvilleLogoEdited city, you know? That’s kinda where I started. 

“I got into music early on. In the early nineties, I was working on some projects and felt pretty good about it, actually. I had a pretty good EP together. I played it for my grandpa and he said he liked what he heard but because of that, he wanted me to have a backup plan; go finish school or get a job or whatever. In case it falls through, ‘I don’t want you to put everything into music quite yet. You’re too young.’ 

“I just turned twenty-one and he said he wanted me to go to the police academy. So, I went to the police academy. I was a police officer right under eight years. During that time – I’ve always

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